1 239 514 3081 mail@icsamail.com

Test Migration New

The “Power and Control Wheel”: Its Contributions to Understanding Cultic Relationships

Chelsea Brass, MPAff; Steve Eichel, PhD; Abigail Hazlett, BA
Thursday, July 5, 2018 from 2:30- 4:00
1.5 CE hours
Abstract

The “”Power and Control Wheel,” also known as the “Duluth Wheel,” is a model for understanding intimate partner violence, or IPV (aka “”domestic violence””) that has been well-received and accepted by professionals working with victims and perpetrators of IPV. Former group members and those working in the field already understand that, like many other abusive social organizations and relationships, when ideology and individual cult practices are stripped away, cults are about power and control. As such, we have found the power and control wheel to be indispensable in understanding and communicating abuser tactics and the accompanying victim experience. We believe that those underlying dynamics of power and control are central to the study of abusive groups and organizations, as the cultic group structure is characterized by abusive dyadic and familial-style interactions. Furthermore, group influence appears to reinforce and mimic the abuse of the dyadic tie between leader(s) and each respective follower. The power and control dynamic within abusive relationships is intrinsically similar to the dyadic and/or familial dynamics core to the victim experience in abusive organizations such as cults. If our insights regarding shared, underlying dynamics of coercive control ring true, these fields (along with other related fields) should not be siloed; we should be intentional about applying any insights from one field to serve another. Victim advocates Abigail Dalgleish Hazlett and Chelsea Brass will discuss their research on the application of the Power and Control Wheel to cultic relationships, paying close attention to where there is overlap between IPV and cultic dynamics. Dr. Steve Eichel will discuss how the Power and Control Wheel complements and solidifies the undue influence and thought reform paradigms that have traditionally been applied to cultic relationships. 
Learning Objectives
1. Participants will be able to list and explain the major components of the power and control (P&C) wheel.
2. Participants will be able to describe at least 2 ways in which a part of the P&C wheel overlap with cultic dynamics and what parts may not, or are in dispute.
3. Participants will be able to express at least one reason why it is important to know the distinctions between cultic dynamics and domestic/intimate partner violence or abuse on the P&C wheel.
4. Participants will be able to list at least one way in which the knowledge of what can be done with this information will be helpful.

Speakers

Chelsea Brass, MPAff, is a health policy and planning professional and doctoral student in interpersonal communication at the University of Texas at Austin with a planned emphasis on public health and safety campaigns as well as a goal of designing clinical interventions for trauma center patients deemed at-risk of highly-controlling domestic violence. Chelsea received a Master’s degree of Public Affairs at the University of Texas at Austin and a completed a bachelor’s degree at the University of California at Santa Barbara in Global and International Studies, with a regional focus on South and Central America, an emphasis on socioeconomic and political processes. She serves on the advisory board of International Cultic Studies Association and the Open Minds Foundation. She is co-creator of the Coercive Control Collective, an organization focused on sharing research and news about the concept of coercive control and advocating for the use of a coercive control framework for understanding extreme forms of abuse across disciplines, including policy initiatives, education and prevention efforts in the United Stat

Steve K. D. Eichel, PhD, ABPP, ICSA President, is Past-President of the American Academy of Counseling Psychology and the Greater Philadelphia Society of Clinical Hypnosis. He is a licensed and Board-certified counseling psychologist whose involvement in cultic studies began with a participant-observation study of Unification Church training in their Eastern seminary (in Barrytown, NY) in the spring of 1975. His doctoral dissertation to date remains the only intensive, quantified observation of a deprogramming. He was honored with AFF’s 1990 John G. Clark Award for Distinguished Scholarship in Cultic Studies for this study, which was published as a special issue of the Cultic Studies Journal and has been translated into several foreign languages. In 1983, along with Dr. Linda Dubrow-Marshall and clinical social worker Roberta Eisenberg, Dr. Eichel founded the Re-Entry Therapy, Information & Referral Network (RETIRN), one of the field’s oldest continuing private providers of psychological services to families and individuals harmed by cultic practices. RETIRN currently has offices in Newark, DE, Lansdowne, PA and Pontypridd, Wales and Buxton, England (U.K.). In addition to his psychology practice and his involvement with ICSA, Dr. Eichel is active in a range of professional associations. He has co-authored several articles and book reviews on cult-related topics for the CSJ/CSR. In 2016 he received ICSA’s Herbert L. Rosedale Award at the Annual Conference in Dallas, Texas. [Directors]

Abigail Dalgleish Hazlett is a researcher and victim advocate. Abigail has presented on the issue of sexual violence to a variety of audiences and, while in school, she co-founded a community organization focused on the prevention of sexual violence and advocacy for victims. Her undergraduate research examined Christian clergy’s training in handling sexual violence in their congregations. She hopes to use her research to develop a training that can be implemented into seminary school curricula. She now resides in Austin, Texas with her husband and two children. She will begin graduate work in Communication Studies at the University of Texas at Austin in Fall 2018, focusing on trauma’s impact on victims and their relationships, as well as institutional responses to trauma and abuse. She is co-creator of the Coercive Control Collective, an organization focused on sharing research and news about the concept of coercive control and advocating for the use of a coercive control framework for understanding extreme forms of abuse across disciplines, including policy initiatives, education and prevention efforts in the United States.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

1 239 514 3081 mail@icsamail.com